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of the u.s. government it would make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. but some things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market
of the u.s. government it uld make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. butome things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market fo
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the econy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put people out of work and that would have a negative effect on the economy, would it not? >> it would, adam. real quick, a bit of news here. president obama will deliver a statement at 4:45, something i imagine we'll cover live here on fox business. adam: we will. >> 5:45 president obama deliver as statement here at the white house. as far as spending cuts are concerned, you see this argument, you typically hear republicans say, go
-- relation to gdp or never, we are not quite as bad as greece or portugal ornever, but they are just talking about a few ring keating billions. a trillion word is really unique to the united stat. and i think that is what is going to kill us, the absolute numbers. germany can affo to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually th bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american faily. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are presidenta taxes on our middle-class. >> the bill is p
or any american congress borrow anymore money until with fix this country from becoming greece. that requires significant entitlement reform to save social from bankruptcy and medicare from bankruptcy. social security is going bankrupt in about 20, 25 years. medicare is going bankrupt in 15 or 20 years. the baby boomers are coming in at 10,000 a day. and we just can't scene this. martha: president last week said we'll not play that game. last time around they wouldn't let the debt ceiling go up, i tell you right now, something to this effect we will play that game. >> we will play that game, mr. president. that is not a game. the game you're play something small ball. you're talking about raising rates on top 2% that would run the government for 11 days. you got reelected. how about doing something big that is not liberal? how about doing something big that is bipartisan. every big idea he has is a liberal idea that drowns us in debt. how been maing up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece? doing what boehner, tip o'n
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
a cliff, not greece, but lower growth on a sustained beats, you are talking about when you get up debt there, it can hold back your growth for decades there are other things you can do to make up for it, you can have innovation and other improvements but it is definitely problematic. you know, you start getting up at levels twice where we are, then i think it gets really dangerous, nobody knows where inbetween you really fall off a cliff. i thigh it is hyperbole to say that the united states is going to become greece but it is not hyperbole to compare us to japan and wonder if we get stuck in this slow growth quagmire. europe might be even more in danger of that. >> rose: okay. let's stop right there. do you think that we are at risk of getting stuck in the slow growth quagmire that japan got stuck in, the united states economy? >> well, i would say we are in a mild version of it now, and, you know, we need to do improvements and reforms. i don't think spending money is the solution. there are smart ways to spend it for sure, but i don't buy this idea that bigger keynesian stimulus wi
for government to keep raising the value added tax. we've seen it happened in spain, italy and greece and wherever it's tried. adam: i lived in spain a long time ago. i guess you realize you don't paying it at the time but things are more expensive. david: thank you, gang. thank you very much. thanks to the company. thanks to you for watching. now here are dagen and dennis. hi, gang. dagen: merry christmas. love to your family. david: thank you. same to yours. dagen: i'm dagen mcdowell everybody. dennis: i'm dennis neal -- kneale. dagen: is it the fiscal cliff fears that have shoppers down this season? retailers are reporting slowing sales over the last couple of weeks. dennis: a woman fired for being too attractive and a supreme court says it is legal. dagen: i will bite my tongue because it is the top of the hour and stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. hey nicole. nicole: i look forward to hearing more about that particular story as i watch the stock market here, i do see the dow is down about 1/3 of 1%. majority of the dow components a
the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused on the wage improvement in competitiveness. >> all right giles, more to come from you you. also we'll hear from the stars of les mis about why the classic story will resonate with the current economic climate. and later in the program, we'll also hear from the nigerian finance minister about the resources boom. but you what about the corruption issue. and we'll also hear first from apple's new ceo tim cook about steve jobs' legacy and his future plans for the tech giant. plus of course we'll continue to keep you updated on the reaction and the latest dealings from the earthquake in japan. >>> a 7.3 magnitude earthqu
into a crisis like we have seen in greece and many other countries. it is dangerous when it gets too high, and we are moving close to that dangerous level every day. >> well now you have seen how much debt we have, how about where all of that money goes? the federal government spends more than $11 billion a day, $3 billion going to the department of health and human services. $2.5 billion go to social security. $1.8 billion to the defense department. but economists say most concerning of all is the $854 million a day hour country pays on our debt every single day. so we want to know what you think about the cost of spending. do you think your tax dollars should be spent better, in some other way? tweet your answers to us. i will read some of your responses. you can watch the entire cost of spending on our special report. and don't go away. we have some very special guests coming up in our studio. we will introduce you to a group in washington that is making sure some of our animal friends find a loving home this holiday. and some news you can use. what could going over the fiscal cliff me
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
in. and that that is unsustainable. the question is does that all lead to greece? part four of our series "the cost of spending" looks at dangerous consequences. interest rates and the role of the federal reserve. >> if a government destroys the value of currency, it will destroy the middle class. >> ron paul railed against the federal reserve and got applaud from growing clouds. >> we don't have the money, run out of borrowing power and guess what they do? they start printing money. >> despite paul and others' criticism the fed acted more aggressively. doubling down on printing more money each month to keep interest rates low for the future. >> it's likely warranted through 2015. >> why are they doing it? go back to the national debt clock. remember, we were staring at it it early in series. the debt to gdp or gross domestic product ratio is at 102%. the highest since just after world war ii. that is with extremely and historically low interest rates. even at these rates, that interest will cost the u.s. more and more every year. $222 billion in interest payments on the debt this
, california doesn't have the money for it. >> california is america's greece. we continue see them, you know, gone past the proverbial, you know, they have gone over, and it feels weir base there's people re-election -- weird because there's a lot of people who are relatively poor, and if you're rich, you can handle it, but they both are together on the same things, and it's those people in the middle, those 1 million, by the way, who left in the last ten years to go to texas because they are the ones who get crush in all of this, and real opportunities are a loss for everyone, and at some point, you hit a break wall. it's happening around the world right now. neil: how many will actually use it for the intentions it has? >> from what i read, they admit programs like this around the country have been ripe with all kinds of frauds. i would suspect a vast majority sell it. i can't imagine, you know, a lot of homeless people are drug addicts, you know, we got -- by the way, we got a lot of programs out there. you know, for homeless people, and we got a ton of programs. i know people who have no
treated in local hospitals. as you mentioned a police officer from nearby greece, new york was apparently driving by. he was injured when his vehicle or the area near him was hit by shrapnel. now, as for the crime scene itself, the authorities say that they believe that the shooter is dead. no word as to his identity. also not clear, kelly, is what type of weapon he had with him. the authorities said that it was not clear if it was an assault rifle, the type of weapon we have heard so much about during the past few days. we expect that there will be more information later today. they say there will be a news conference at 2:00 this afternoon. another thing to keep in mind is that because of the attack on the firemen, they were unable to put out the house fire, and what began as a house fire and vehicle fire then spread to at least three other buildings. we are toll that they were destroyed. others also damaged. and firefighters are on the scene trying to put out the flames. also, still yet to be known, kelly, and this is key, is might there be other victims here, because they are still tr
not become greece? it is interesting that we talked about the fiscal coordination have in the countries and to last come along and bail them out when they have not done what they're supposed to do? i do not know that we are that much different. we have a great panel. people thought are far smarter than i am. i will introduce them now. and then i will sit down and i did ask some questions to revival at the panel to keep their answers relatively short so we can run through a lot of questions and get out of here on time. we have ailson frasier, director of the institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues, including federal spending, taxes, the debt and deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor. next, rudy penner, the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair in public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long career, he was director of the congressional bu
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
saying the world was going to end because greece was going to default and leave the euro. it's all over. europe's fine. just give it a break. that was last year's story. [ overlapping speakers ] >> europe is not fine. spain is in significantly worse position. they've taken on more debt into deteriorating economy. you tell me how that translates to this has all been fixed and this is all solved. it's not solved at all. [ overlapping speakers ] >> spain has about the same debt to gdp ratio as germany. that good enough for you? >> [ overlapping speakers ] >> hang on, fellows. let's not get hung up on spain. what i want to come back to is the usa. because our market has not collapsed, it's really different than it looks like it was back in 2011. i just want to ask, is it better to own those low-rate bonds right now? or jim la camp, i want you both to weigh in quickly. is it better to own corporate bonds or treasury bonds during this tiff over the fiscal cliff, or is it better to own stocks? real quick. >> well, short term we're going to have a lot of gyrations. but those yields are under th
the european markets are up for the year except portugal, which is up slightly. even greece is up year to date. i don't think you're too late on that trade at all. in fact, i think, quite frankly, the structural changes that are happening in europe could produce growth for many years come. >> where are you putting money to work, george? >> the fiscal cliff is sort of the uncertainty du jour. people are always worried about next uncertainty. you need to blow past that and think about where the next good stocks going to be, how can i invest, how can i participate? taxes are likely to go up, but this is a lot of rattling. both sides of the aisle would come together. they'll figure out what's best. at the end of the day, they know they have to help the little guy, the consumer. pool corp. sells everything but the water. they're suppliers for the pool industry. we think they'll grow at 18%. they have very little debt. it's like an annuity. all the pools in this country are seven years old. we love that kind of stock. >> bill, i take issue with the idea this is just saber rattling. if dividends trip
towards greece and european decline. we all know and both parties recognize a resolution to medicare liabilities has to be part of a solution. >> give me one idea you would be ready to sign onto today that would significantly reduce medicare spending. >> we've already passed such a solution in the house. last year we passed legislation that would reform medicare. the budget paul ryan, chairman of the budget committee put forward, passed it to the house, senate hasn't passed a bunl in 1,000 days. we weren't able to get them engaged on that topic. that proposal able to bend the cost curve in medicare, put us toward the budget and preserve medicare exactly the way it is for current retirees. that's the balance you have to strike. that legislation struck a balance of 55 and above keeping medicare exactly the way it is and making changes for those in their 20s and 30s and 40s. most people i talk to in those groups understand we've got to reform medicare to save it and balance the federal budget. >> congressman, good luck to you. hopefully we'll see you on the other side of a deal. sue. >>
heard it compared to the fiscal crisis in greece, 63% had heard it. in that number 36% had read a lot about it or heard a lot about it. do they believe a solution is likely? our numbers different from other poles. americans are more optic. first of all see what they think, unlikely 73% back in november when we asked about the debt program would there be an agreement, 73% saying that, now 44%. the number you want to think is 4% to 44% thinks a solution is likely. who thinks it's likely, that's interesting and driving this number. he can break it down by party. look at what we find, republicans 52-42, independents, i come back here, there we go, independents 47-32 and it's really what you see here 60% of democrats think it's unlikely. i just want to show you again when we get to the issue of 48% to 44% believing it's likely, it's mostly different by democrats. we it break it down further into what people expect, what kind of solutions work? think of this chart as the politician's guide to solving the fiscal cliff and remaining in office. the net percent acceptable minus the percent that
at the pace it has been growing. we do have an advantage that greece does not have. we print the world's money. we cannot expect the dollar will be keen to tomorrow. -- forever. if the europeans can manage their deficit and we cannot, the world will switch to euros. there is a tweet here -- guest: the cbo is supposed to be a political, but it cannot be too alarmist. if we go over the cliff, we are looking on january 1, some of this is already milton. about $600 million -- $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases. that is about 4% of gdp. that is an enormous negative stimulus. a detraction from demand. that would surely be a deep recession. the cbo relies on simulation models that did not take into consideration investor sentiment, the reaction of consumers, and so forth that they wholly lose confidence in their government. if we go over the cliff and stay there, people will start to conclude that washington cannot manage its affairs. all bets are off on economic modeling. it is impossible to say what happened that other than it would be very negative. host: one piece that you actually d
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
the world markets are watching and america may be on the verge of a disaster bigger than greece. senator shelby republican from alabama joins us live. thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> shannon: what do you make of where we are right now? because, you know, to hear that the treasury secretary went to the hill with the white house with the president's proposal and that republicans actually laughed because they didn't say it was believable, it sounds like we are nowhere. >> i think the real impasse. the clock is ticking. this is december. and we know what happens on december 31. but i believe the president is going to have to meet us at least halfway. if we could do this, we could do a lot of things. i think that speaker boehner, senator mcconnell want to do something. if the president is determined to have more taxes. more spending. and cuts later, that is not going to work with the republicans. if so, i hope we won't blink at the end of the day. >> shannon: i want to play a sound bite from a colleague, senator lindsey graham from south carolina. here is where he said about w
this morning. i had no idea -- i had no idea it was an immigrant company. >> you thought it was from greece. [laughter] >> exactly, you know. i had no idea. these google -- all of these companies which maybe it needs to be a marketing campaign. i don't know. but something i think should be done to change the image of immigrants and make it more positive, and i think that will facilitate everything we're talking about today. so how do you guys think we can maybe change that image of immigrants and make it more positive and not make everybody, when they think of immigrants think of border wars on history channel. >> well, at different times and places, immigrants have been viewed more or less favorably in the united states. this is a nation of immigrants. but when immigration was largely cut off during the 1920's, a lot of americans became somewhat estranged from the immigrant roots of their forebearers. and lost a sense that we were a nation of immigrants. but in some parts of the country today you see the enormous economic vitality it comes with a really diverse and active population that a
for revenues including tax rate hikes although i don't like them to save the country from becoming greece but i will not set aside $1.32 million in cuts. >>reporter: if nothing happens by the end of the year taxes go up for everyone. >>heather: when do we get back to work on a fiscal cliff clear? >>reporter: shortly after christmas when speaker boehner and the president are back in washington. before leaving town, president obama scaled back his goals for the last few days of the year between now and new year's focusing on middle-class tax cut and extended unemployment benefits. he is holding out for higher tax on the wealthy. the supporters say that should come as in surprise. >> on taxes, i know it is hard for the republicans but the president ran on that platform, $250,000 and no taxes for people below and he won 60 percent of the voters saying they are for it including some republicans. >>reporter: senator lieberman, an independent from connecticut says it is looking likely we will go over the fiscal cliff. >>heather: thank you from washington, dc, steve. >>gregg: president obama spending t
've accomplished very little in terms of not becoming greece or getting out of debt. this deal won't affect the debt situation heather: welcome back. investigators are examining the black boxes in the deadly plane crash in russia. amateur video capturing it on tape. now we're learning at least five people died and three others were badly hurt. the plane took off from an airport near moskow. it landed on a highway before breaking pieces and catching on fire. gregg: new videotape shoug house majority leader eric cantor arriving at capitol hill. he really didn't say much of anything. he was asked what's going on, is there a deal? he basically said, happy new year, happy new year, happy new year three times. and the senate is not convening until about 11:00 a.m.. it may not be officially reconvening but just meeting. that was the time that harry reid said it would happen. tony sayegh, former press aide to gop vice-presidential nominee jack kemp and national political correspondent for talk radio news service. kirsten powers, columnist for "the daily beast" and fox news contributor. questions te
, especially if greece is right that the judicial review is that going to extend to outside organizations. adults think thailand is that close to afghanistan. geographic proximity is the watchword for detention authority to offer that lax judicial review, but i think, as did play a very clear role in legislating for those cases where they're will be constitutionally require judicial review in india think that if there is every concern we might take advantage of the decision, which i think he easily be taken advantage of, congress did say in cases of individuals picked up outside the united states and not in as on of active combat operation, here is some minimal steps toward procedures that the government must follow which would go a long way toward obviating the concerns that tries to raise, leaving the battlefield issues for another day because i don't think the issue is how many people are on the battlefield in afghanistan. the reality is, as our active combat operations wind down, that number is decreasing to zero. the question is, when we picked up pirates in the gulf of aden, when we
indebted developed country in the world. much worse than even greece. then look at demographics, a little known program that haunts japan, they are having ever fewer babies. they don't want mass immigration to top a falling population and they are living a whole lot longer. so they have a lot of seniors and a tiny up and coming generation. japan has the most extreme demographics in recorded human history. what are they doing b a it? -- about it? not much you can do to persuade liberated japanese women to have more children with very traditional japanese men. that's a huge problem. demographics, like a super tanker, it takes a long time to turn it around. but japan has just elected a new government which promises to get the country out of its 20 year malaise. how is it going to do that? the new prime minister wants to print a ton of money and huge stimulus plan building yet more infrastructure. does that ring a bell? have we seen something like that here? it really can be useful, you know, to look over there. it might show us over here where we might be going. not good. [ male announcer ]
there are two that we're watching for american investors. one is greece, one is italy. the developments today are both good from an american investing perspective because they keep a lid on what's happening in those two respects. in greece there was trouble on the streets of athens last night as a result of left-wing protesters and students out and police using tear gas to disperse them as they protested the death of a teenager as a result of a police shooting four years ago, but the more important thing from a market perspective is that in 30 minutes' time now, the book will close on the greek debt buyback. now, remember what's happening here. the greek government is borrowing 10 billion euros from the rest of europe to buy back its own debt at a discount. if it does that successfully, by midday our time when that book closes, then more cash will flow through from the rest of europe, possibly next week it will be able to repay its bills and capitalize on the banks. let's check the close. >> the european markets are closing now. >> so we kind of went nowhere today. a lot of these markets in e
with greece. the buyback has gone through. they've raised over 31 million euros -- billion euros at face value. it would appear they had to pay more to get the debt off the u.s. hedge funds and the greek banks and everybody else. therefore they're short by about 450 million euros on their targets. eurozone conference call is about to start with the finance ministers to sort out exactly what they do. in general terms around europe today there is optimism. you'll see that in this close. europe shutting down. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as
's who -- >> and pay everybody more money. >> they can buy stuff and go back on vacation in greece and all that stuff. >> do we count -- i'm getting -- there's nothing like this to get the twitterers going wild. 1-1-1 is -- 1-1-2001 -- >> 2001? >> yeah. >> yeah? >> 2101. >> yeah? >> less than -- >> you got a zero in there. >> less than 100 years. >> but it's 1-1-1 -- >> but 01 you'd write it probably. >> you would want to get to ten 10-10-10. 10-10-2110. i had someone call me dummy and say -- >> you? >> yeah. said it's 988 years. then he called me a dummy. i tweeted back to the guy, i'm the dummy? i'm the dummy? 988 years? i'm the dummy? the fed is meeting today -- i admit it, i resemble that remark. you're with me, pal. the fed is meeting to discuss whether operation twist will expire at the end of the month. and jerry webman is here. >> i showed up. >> chief economist. >> and union member. >> a unionyist. >> honorary union member. so is leaseman actually. maybe you can -- >> the president -- >> maybe -- you probably with -- >> workers fly i guess. we are strong, solid, more than
. this morning, they agreed finally on the disbursement of aid to greece. some says it removed uncertainty. other investors, not so sure. i wanted to show you the italian curve, italy and spanl wrapping up their fund-raising for the year. their auctions weren't all of that huge, but we are seeing yields fall, prices rise across the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a cou
of greece. we saw these up in the range of better than 8% earlier. now in the range of 5% to 8%. again, if you look at the levels, you see we're snapping up from low valuations generally speaking. it doesn't take a lot at 63 cents to get an 8% move. >>> quick look over here if you want to take a shot of the wall behind me. it is green for the most part. and greece's borse is one adding 2% today. we're seeing that reflected across the bond space. portugal for example seeing ten-year yields falling. same for spain and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on t
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
of becoming greece. >> the president's aides not surprisingly quickly rejected the plan which republicans say would bring in $800 billion in higher tax revenue without raising rates. white house communications director said, quote, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill. press secretary jay carney said mr. obama is determined to phase out the bush administration tax cuts for families making more than $250,000 a year. >> he will not sign a bill that extends those tax rates for the top 2%. we can't afford it. it is not a wise economic policy or wise fiscal policy. and it would defeat the principle of balance that he has embraced. >> so with less than a month to go before the deadline, we've now had an offer and a counteroffer, but arguably, no real attempt at compromise. democrats say republicans haven't detailed how they would increase tax revenue and they haven't offered enough of it and republicans say democrats haven't agreed to serious entitlement program cuts. steve, gretchen, brian? >> steve: thank you very much, live from the north
, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raising of the debt ceiling be tied to these overall conversations or is that too dangerous? you talk about people shied away from your debt. caller: yes. you are going to have a tipping point that people are blind to. since 1847 with popular delusions and the madness of crowds when you get a contagion in there, you do not know what is going to be. people are going to run for the door. it is just stupid. they should have done the tax cuts first and then see if they need to raise taxes. the more sound policy is to cut some savings first to even see if we have to raise taxes. host: here is the statement put out by the white house yesterday. it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bell. bill. susan in pennsylvania, a democratic caller. welcome to the conversation. caller: what i am thinking is the
on this friday. first, 26% that. is what the jobless rate in greece soared to in september. 26%! the country defeating spain to win the highest unemployment rate in europe. congratulations. not. next, $2 billion. that's how much a cable box cost when it's not even on. they continue to run using up electricity. the worst offenders, dvr's. that's $2 billion across the country. not just at your house. and finally, $5,000. that's the christmas bonus being handed to employees at publisher random house. they can thank this year's best seller "50 shades of gray" and $55,000 for christmas bonus. gretch, over to you and a couple of special guests. >> gretchen: this next story is an emotional one and the perfect one for the christmas season. five years ago, doctors told our next guest that he would never walk again. on christmas eve, he was involved in a deadly rather cash. older driver spun out of control, crashing into his family's suv, can iing both his father and his brother, 17-year-old girlfriend. brock was left paralyzed from the waist down. but he never stopped living his life and believing th
. president, and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> okay. there we go. some advice there for the president. >>> here with us now former white house counselor for president bush. ceo of the consulting firm, hill and milton strategies. dan bartlett back at the table. good to have you this morning. a couple must reads to look at. >> you can ask a question if i can ask rattner a question. you go first. >> when are you going to man up? what happened, man? we republicans, we used to drive liberals crazy. we'd win elections we shouldn't win. we would steal senate seats we should never steal. we would shock -- they never saw it coming. willie geist talked about the morning after the 2004 election, you had liberals on the upper west sidewalking around like zombies. some of them walked straight into the hudson river. that doesn't happen. we're not the smart party, we're the stupid party. what happened? >> well, there's that. >> what happened in '12? how did we perform so badly? is it our tactics? >> well, the primary process obviously didn't help us
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